New on the blog: Doing Women, Peace and Security better: Opportunities for the next UK National Action Plan

Publications

Background Since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August 2021 following the US and allied forces withdrawal, Human Rights Watch and other organisations have…
This briefing evaluates the UK’s contribution to the Women, Peace and Security agenda over the last fifteen years. Addressing strengths and limitations, it analyses successive thematic priorities, maps WPS spending, and considers common criticism. It draws out recommendations for future plans on infrastructure and monitoring, domestic applications and policy ambition.
Far from delivering on the promise of providing greater access to justice for victims, the land restitution system in Colombia - where victims of land dispossession and forced abandonment can apply for restitution of their lands lost as a result of the armed conflict - has denied most requests at the administrative stage.
This short video presents our recently concluded research on funding precarity and women’s peace work. This project explored how women’s civil society organisations that are engaged in peace work in Colombia, Nepal, and Northern Ireland experience the funding relationships in which they are embedded.
Dr Neelam Raina and Professor Brad Blitz give evidence on the UK's withdrawal from Afghanistan to the Defence Select Committee.
This paper draws on qualitative and participatory interview conversations and mapping of social and other forms of media to analyse the post-conflict communities’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Uganda. The findings indicate that COVID-19 stripped communities of social capital central to their efforts towards social cohesion.
Prosecution of conflict related sexual violence (CRSV) in Sri Lanka remains notoriously intractable. Through an analysis of the Vishvamadu case, this study examines a variety of silences and disablements across a range of articulations and practices that work against the successful prosecution of CRSV in Sri Lanka, and thereby the delivery of justice to women victim-survivors who seek redress through a formal judicial process.
In recent years, interest has grown in how Transitional Justice (TJ) can approach colonial harms and their long-lasting effects, because of a lacuna in both TJ practice and academic research. Scant attention has been paid, particularly, to how peace processes themselves can be undermined by ongoing colonial legacies.

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